MAHASAMBHUTI CHAKRADHAR’S INVITATION TO ALL DHARMA GURUS FOR THE DHARMA MAHA YUDH

I, Taraka Brahma, have already taken birth on this earth as Mahasambhuti Chakradhar in order to establish Dharma. On January 1st, 2010 I am going to declare Dharma Maha Yudh against Adharma. I invite all you Dharma Gurus to fight the war on the side of Dharma. All those who fight the war on the side of Adharma will be completely eradicated (Sarvanash).

“Paritranay Sadhunam Vinashay cha Dushkritam

Dharma Sansthapanarthaya Sambhavami Yuge yuge”

MAHASAMBHUTI CHAKRADHAR

What is DHARMA?

So much has been said in the previous posts about Dharma. Hence it is important that it be defined.

Dharma is derived from the root verb dhr plus man. It means “that which provides support to the inner qualities, the intrinsic traits”. In other words, that which provides support to the essential qualities and the specific traits of an entity is dharma. Every object in this manifest world has its own dharma. For instance, water has its own dharma; fire has its own dharma; oxygen and nitrogen also have their own respective dharmas. And it is by virtue of their dharmas that different objects can be distinguished from one another.

If an object loses its capacity to burn, it can no longer be called fire. Similarly, if the thirst-quenching property is absent in an object, it is not water. Each elemental object carries its own identity through its dharma.

Each and every being of the universe has its own dharma. Even trees and creepers have their own dharmas. The dharma of trees and creepers is to seek certain goals, that is, to collect nourishment, to develop physically, to multiply through seeds and saplings, and then to get lost in the abyss of darkness so as to be born again. The life of animals is similar; the only difference is that animals are a little more developed than trees and creepers. They have one additional quality or trait, and that additional quality is the ability to move from one place to another. Plants cannot make such movements. So plants and animals have some common qualities, but animals have an extra quality, that they can move. That is why animals are said to be movable, while trees and plants are immovable.

What is meant by the dharma of human beings? One dharma of humans isjaeva dharma [the dharma of living beings], which plants, animals and humans, all three, all have in common. As animals, humans also have another quality, namely their movement from one place to another. This quality is also one of their traits. It is a dharma that they share with [animals]; but the dharma that human beings have in addition to this is their Bhágavata dharma. The life of animals and plants is wholly given to their senses. They have nothing beyond their physical needs and comforts. But some human beings are conscious of having one more dharma – Bhágavata dharma. The basic idea or controlling idea of human beings’ Bhágavata dharma is that they will move ceaselessly and uncompromisingly towards the highest ideal, towards Parama Puruśa.

Humans’ future is always bright. Never is it clouded with darkness. Because human beings’ guide is the most radiant and most brilliant Entity in the universe, and the final goal of their life’s journey.

The Supreme Being, the most effulgent Entity, is always present before you. Hence the future of anyone, whether sinful or virtuous, is always bright. One’s future can never be bleak. Hence people should continue to move without pause towards Parama Puruśa, maintaining a little adjustment with the jaeva dharma or animal dharma in them – this is human dharma. People have a physical life and also a mental life, but their speciality is their tireless movement towards Parama Puruśa. That is exactly what the Giitá wants to convey by saying that Bhágavata dharma is the svadharma of human beings.

Dharma is one for all human beings, and that dharma is mánava dharma.

The Transitional Period- “yugasandhi”

What does “yugasandhi” mean? “Yuga” means “age” and “sandhi” means “joint”. Therefore yugasandhi means “juncture between ages”.

At a certain stage in the movement of human society along its path, the behaviour, manners, customs, intellect and wisdom of the people cease to develop – they become static; and society loses its capacity to move forward. This is the critical juncture in history when the society feels the need for an extraordinarily powerful personality, a Mahásambhúti. At this juncture the advent of such a mighty personality is inevitable.

“Mahásambhúti”, infuses dynamism in the social body and accelerates the speed of movement. All the virtuous people in the world respond to his call and rally around him. He creates a polarization in the society: the virtuous versus the wicked. In the clash between the two groups, the virtuous people emerge victorious by dint of their special efforts coupled with the grace of that great personality. His advent itself signifies victory in the war.

The brave companions of this Mahásambhúti accompany him from age to age preferring to work with Him than attain their own liberation. In the last phase of the conflict, the evil forces are bound to accept total defeat. Therefore, to those of you marching forward on the path of virtue, the path of dharma, I say, “Keep marching on safely and without concern.”

In the present day, you can see for yourself how the social movement is grinding to a halt. When social progress loses its velocity it is called “yugasandhi” (transitional period) in Saḿskrta. You have all been born in such a transitional period and have assembled here today. In the future, the honest and virtuous people of the society will respond to Your call and will unite. The same polarization is taking place now as occurred in the past: the honest people are with you and will remain with you; the dishonest people win oppose you now and will continue their efforts to block your progress in future. Whenever there a war between dharma and adharma, you are sure to be victorious. You are not alone – dharma is with you, the benevolent intellect is with you, and I am also with you.

The Advent of The Lord (Mahásambhúti)

Here is the explaination of the couplet mentioned in the introduction (view the 2nd post), the words which Lord Krishna has said on the battlefield to Arjuna:

Yadá yadá hi dharmasya glánirbhavati Bhárata;
Cábhyutthánamadharmasya tadátmánaḿ srjámyáham
.

[O Bhárata, at a time when dharma is distorted and adharma is ascendant, I create myself out of my own fundamental factors.]

Some 3500 years ago, Krśńa was born. His advent was just at a crucial time – humanity was suffering then. He removed the suffering of humanity by creating Mahábhárata. He gave an assurance to the entire world that there would not be degradation of dharma, that He would come and save it.

What is the meaning of yadá yadá? Yadá means “at the proper moment”, “at the most opportune moment”.

He says that “Whenever there is degradation of dharma and development of adharma, rule of adharma, regime of adharma, then, and in that particular moment, I recreate Myself.”

What is gláni? It is a lower state, beneath the generally-accepted standard. When dharma goes lower than its accepted standard, it is said to suffer gláni. For instance, the commonly-accepted place for a crown is the head; if someone wears it on his foot, it can be considered to have suffered degradation. So Krśńa says that where there is degradation in dharma and adharma rises – when people’s hats decorate their feet, and their sandals, their heads – He comes as Táraka Brahma [Liberating Brahma] to reinstate dharma to its original status.. Then He creates tat átmá – tadátmá [in the shloka], that is, Táraka Brahma. Táraka Brahma polarizes dharma and adharma. He makes them prepared to fight.

Whenever dharma comes into a secondary position, a degraded position, a depraved position; that is, dharma is being defeated by adharma in that temporary phase of the war – finally dharma wins, but you know, a war is divided into several phases, and each and every phase is known as a battle. So in one battle, adharma may win, in another battle, dharma may win, but finally, as a result of the final fight of the war, dharma wins. Hence, O human beings, do not get scared, light is sure to come after darkness.

What is Satya?

Satya, or in other words, TRUTH, is defined thus:

1. What you think, what you speak and what you do, should be one and the same.

2. At the same time, it should be in the welfare of the society.

3. It should also result in spiritual progress (yours and others).

Sounds simple enough doesnt it? But for the action to be defined as satya, or “being in satya” it should satisfy all 3 criteria. For instance, a burglar, who would certainly be doing the 1st point (thinking about robbing, voicing his intentions and then doing the act of robbing) does not mean he is satya. For he has not acted in the welfare of society.

Consider another instance, a rich person decides to organise a feast for the entire community where he resides. Point 1 and 2 satisfied, but is point 3 satisfied? No, for there was no spiritual progress for anyone.

So following Satya is better said than done. But the easiest way to do it is, LEAVE ASATYA. Anything that does not follow either of the 3 points, is considered Asatya.

Try to establish yourself in Satya.